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Film Review: ‘What is Ape?’

By Entertainment, Featured

Owen Teague in “Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes” (2024).

“What does it mean to be an ape?” is the question new protagonist Noa (Owen Teague) asks himself and the human Mae (Freya Allan) in the conclusion of “Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes.” An answer to this could also explain what happens to apes when they try to “be” human.

“Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes” is the fourth movie in the rebooted “Planet of the Apes” series as directed by Matt Reeves and Robert Wyatt. “Kingdom,” directed by Wes Ball, shows a classic Hero’s Journey that explores the world of the apes generations post Caesar, the reboot trilogy’s lead. On the surface, audiences may perceive this fourth film as unnecessary and contrived to keep the series alive. But with exciting direction and a host of new characters, a biting story unfolds bringing new life to a familiar world.

Ball has a tight grip on action and keeps viewers engrossed in every scene with a fast pace and character-building stakes. Our introduction to the new main character, Noa, is gushing with thrills as audiences discover who he is:  An eagle trainer’s son who would do anything it takes for his father’s approval. In an intense scene, Noa faces a difficult set of climbs for eagle eggs. Mountain faces crumble, apes fall from great heights, and it’s all chased by a fiery scene of the invasion of Noa’s peaceful tribe by the Coastal Ape Colony.

Noa finds himself alone, without his father, without the eagles, without his tribe. With his mind set on revenge, Noa traverses where no ape in his tribe has ever gone in order to avenge his father and bring his community home.

On this adventure, Noa discovers the ruins of human society. Across generations, the knowledge of the rise of the apes and the fall of humans has been lost. Noa and his tribe only knew a skewed history of the world, even believing there were very few humans on earth, referring to them as “Echos” who lack intelligence. Noa comes across the ape Raka (Peter Macon) and human Mae. The three travel together to the coast as Raka shares his wisdom of the world and more importantly; Caesar. Noa learns about the relationships between humans and apes, and the memory and history of them has been lost. Raka invites a moral journey for Noa and Mae that they carry with them throughout the film.

Upon arrival to the coastal tribe, audiences discover a kingdom of kidnapped ape tribes living under the dictatorship of the ape Proximus Caesar (Kevin Durand). Proximus claims to follow the teachings of Caesar from many years ago and contorts Caesar’s words to align with his wants of evolution. Proximus abuses Caesar’s famous phrase “Apes stronger together” to justify his colonization of ape tribes. Under his regime, apes are enslaved, brainwashed, and sacrificed in the name of progress.

But Noa has learned about the real Caesar, and he knows what he came to the kingdom to do, and it is not to serve Proximus. Noa is exposed to two sides of the world and shoulders the burden of his knowledge.

So the question still stands: What makes one ape or human? Perhaps Proximus Caesar wasn’t just seeking evolution but chasing humanity, represented by the colonization tactics of Proximus reflecting human histories. And through Mae’s story, human intentions to take back the earth for humanity to and rule the way they did before the apes, looms over the new series, as if humanity “deserves” it.

Ball shares the intent to release two more movies, creating a new trilogy. These movies are bound to push and pull the boundaries of humanity.

The use of CGI is copious as expected, but with this, the film looks stunning. Ball stated in an interview that while actors were covered in cameras and dots to trace their movements, as much of the film as possible was shot in real locations, creating a more natural look. The dystopian look of rundown overgrown buildings and landscapes that viewers may be familiar with from Ball’s previous work like “Maze Runner” (2014)  is extremely appealing.

Owen Teague‘s performance is undoubtedly a large reason audiences are able to be drawn into Noa’s character so quickly. His emotion is powerful and feels true to his character. Kevin Durand also steals the stage with his ominous presence despite holding a small portion of the lengthy runtime. No scene in the movie feels unnecessary or out of place allowing the cast and direction to flourish.

The best thing about “Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes” is that Caesar is respectfully laid to rest. We are reminded of the history, and he is harkened to in Proximus but by the end of the film, Noa does not become a leader in the same way as Caesar. Though it’s rather grim, the history of Caesar is nearly eliminated from the world of the apes.

For a series that wishes to continue making films, this is a fresh restart to the world that audiences are so familiar with. Watchers are taught a lesson about knowledge and nature, and they are given new grounds to view the world initiated by the “Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes.”

 

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I Hope We Feel Like This Forever-ever

By Alumni, Arts & Culture, SAIC

The School of the Art Institute’s graduating class of 2024 has entered its final stretch; it’s a historically busy time, filled with shows, performances, and theses.

In October, SAIC organized an Open Studio Night,  followed by the annual Graduate Student Salon.

Between Sept. and Oct. 2023, students nominated each other to be featured on F Newsmagazine. The nominations revealed the sense of community so many people feel while attending SAIC. Students across departments admire and take inspiration from each other’s work.

Jim Ter Meer of AIADO Department said that 10 or 15 years ago, students would be guarded, paranoid even, about their neighbors seeing their work, worried that their ideas would be stolen. That’s no longer the case.

As a student graduating this year,  I have witnessed a supportive community sharing ideas with an openness that asks, “Will you imagine with me?” It can be hard to see, but small-scale collaboration does exist between and among individual students.

This collaboration occurs within cohort groups who find friendship and affinity in the subject matter of each other’s art or in the expression of their deepest-held thoughts. Students who share openly and freely find each other and form friendships.

These interviews serve as a time capsule, capturing liminal moments in the studio before the sense of evanescence defines our experience of graduate school in the days after matriculation.

A close-up portrait of Reevah Agarwaal.

Reevah Agarwaal, Print Media and Interdisciplinary

F News: What does your daily practice look like?

Reevah Agarwaal: I work in a lot of mediums. I make quilts, collage, I also write, and I think there are threads that connect all my work together. When I come into the studio, I get right into making, so if I’m not having a visit with someone, it’s usually really messy because I leave things as they were the day before, so when I come in the next day, I’m ready to get back into the progress that I had made in the piece. Then about halfway in the day, I take a break to write or read. So I take about 30 minutes to an hour to write and reflect what I am making, or write a poem related to the narrative that I’m engaging in my work, or read some other text that relates as a form of research.

F News: Tell me a little bit about how collage making and quilt-making overlap in your work.

RA: What I’m doing is a lot of taking fragments and building narratives with those fragments. So I’m not really too concerned with what’s factually accurate or correct when it comes to memory or telling a story. But I’m trying to find threads that sort of fit together. So when I make a collage, I usually start with a photograph that I erase parts from, and whatever’s left becomes the matrix for the collage.

Then I take paper or I make monotypes that intuitively feel like would fit in the spaces, and then that becomes the material for the collage that I then either cut or tear into the shapes and fit everything together. And then similarly for quilt work, I take fabric that I have associations with that I stitch together to create these narratives and these figurative images that address the themes that I’m interested in.

The themes that I’m interested in have to do with the role of women in the home and intimate relationships and power dynamics that exist in often-neglected domestic spaces and the tensions that exist within them. So I take material that belongs to people that these narratives are about and make the work from it.

F News: Are there books or artists who you draw from or inspired by?

RA: Louise Bourgeois is a huge influence for me. Her practice was extremely interdisciplinary, and she never shied away from the personal. Even in my practice, it’s really important to engage the personal and to think about what material is the right vessel for the story I’m trying to tell because I think every concept and every idea or image that I’m playing with demands its own unique set of materials. And I think that’s why I work in a lot of different mediums and with a lot of different methods because I want to be able to address the specificity of things and I think in her work too. Like, she made books and she made drawings and she also made sculpture. Each theme that she’s trying to address within each of these works fits well because she paid attention to what her material was trying to tell her. So she’s a major influence for me personally.

F News: How has your practice changed since the first time you walked into your studio?

RA: When I first came to SAIC and I selected a studio, it was about half this size, and I felt very timid in that space. I didn’t allow myself to feel comfortable in that space because I had a sort of preconceived expectation about what would be expected from me in this institution and as a graduate student working towards a career as an artist. I think that in a lot of ways, that made my work quite rigid because I was thinking a lot about what my visual language is and what my practice is as opposed to just making for the sake of making. In the first year, I would also hold all my critiques in the studio, which, again, was me feeling not yet situated in the space that I was in. And I think taking the summer to actually move studios, move into a bigger space made me realize that maybe I had outgrown that smaller space.

I just let myself be more free here in terms of testing things out, pinning things through the wall to the wall, writing on the wall, having things on display, and also having multiple things going at the same time. Typically, I have two or three works-in-progress going at the same time, and I work on each one when it speaks to me as opposed to the pressure of needing to finish it by a certain date.

In my first year when I first walked in, I had this sort of pressure of, like, “Okay, I need to finish four pieces by the end of the semester,” which is a benchmark. I think in grad school, that’s kind of the point, to have things just be more dynamic and evolving constantly.

F News: Can you tell me a little bit about how you go about getting your materials?

RA: I go to India about two times a year, and every time I go there, I bring a lot of fabric with me that my family was discarding. So it’s clothing they don’t wear anymore, clothing that’s that I inherited from my grandmother who passed, and they were getting rid of; some cabinet that they just cleared. And I get to pick out things that were otherwise going to go to waste. Other things are my own clothing, clothing that I’ve outgrown or don’t wear anymore; trims from things that I altered. I even just go to a thrift store and pick out wood and textiles that I think intuitively, to me, relate to a person or of a memory instead of just purely their aesthetic value.

That becomes the framework of collecting and sourcing the material. Then I keep a little journal where I put a scrap of the material and write about where it’s from and what it reminded me of just so it can later add to the narrative. And then sometimes these small notes become full blown poems about the material. This main fabric that’s on both these pieces, I have been working on a lyric essay about this sari because it belonged to my late grandmother and it keeps coming up in a lot of my work. So thinking about this specific garment, my relationship with her, and my relationship with my mother through this garment as the medium is sort of the process in which I select what fabric to use.

F News: Is there anything that you want to add that I didn’t ask?

RA: I think trust is important, especially trust within myself and what I’m doing. And it’s easy for that trust to sort of labor at times, especially after a bad studio visit or bad critique. But I think what’s important is that the demands of an institution can sometimes be different from the work you’re doing, and sometimes you might not find your audience here. As long as there’s trust in what I’m doing, who I’m doing it for, and who my work is in service to, I think there’s this sense of determination there that I’m excited about, that I I’m excited to leave and find my sense of community outside of this setting even though this setting has given me a lot and given me a lot to think about. It’s also given me a sense of being less apologetic for having a certain vision or being who I am as an artist.

Kimmah Dennis showing off one of her paintings.

Kimmah Dennis, Drawing and Painting

F News: I wanted to know a little bit about your practice since you’re a 2nd-year student, and you’re gonna be matriculating out of the university very soon. And so my first question is, what is your daily practice look like? Can you introduce yourself and then tell me a little bit about how you operate in your studio?

Kimmah Dennis: My daily practice looks like me coming into the studio around like 4 p.m., 5 p.m., staying until, like, 2 a.m., 6 a.m., maybe 1 p.m. that day, and then sleep all day and then come back and repeat over the weekends and when I don’t have classes. My practice is about my family archive or the lack thereof. I was born during the first Liberian Civil War back in 1996. My story begins with this separation from me and my culture. My family had to get pulled from Liberia to go to Guinea, and my mother was pregnant with me at the time.

I was moved from Guinea to Cote D’ivoire where I was born, and then Cote D’ivoire to Ghana. There was a lot of displacement, not really knowing where I belong because this is being uprooted from one location to another, and then finally my family got torn apart where my mother stayed in Ghana with my little brother, my little sister, and my dad, and my big sister, and I came to the US back in 2005. So there’s this kind of disconnect with my family where I didn’t grow up with my siblings and I didn’t grow up with a mother until I turned 15. My practice is kind of rediscovering my family archives, looking at photos, looking at images, hearing stories. It consists of me rebuilding that connection.”

I’m African, and we have a very strong tradition of, like, family, you know, hospitality, connectivity, um, and deeply rooted in one another. Just, uh, a community a strong community. And I feel like that’s kind of where my practice touched place. I’m interacting with people who kind of make an impact on my life and interacting them with other people who maybe they did not know, but now because they know me, they could get to know each other and kinda build that extended family.

F News: Are you inspired by anyone that you see in the school? Who or what are your influences?

KD: My influences are my family, 1st and foremost. Some very extremely amazing professors I had back in undergrad and some advisors that I’m advising with now, but also my cohorts. I know a lot of students who are touching base on the archive. One of my cohort, Lisa Debreau. She also touched base on the family archive. She’s a Jamaican native but she was first generation American so she’s never really got that strong cultural upbringing because she was raised here. So this is this connection between the islands and her and she’s trying to rediscover that connection. Another cohort of mine that’s doing extremely well is Lindsey Adams. She’s a 1st year MFA student. She is a bit less figurative than me and Lisa, but she is still touching on that archival of where Blackness comes from or, how can I explore this in many different ways? She uses a lot of expression of movement; a lot of vibrant colors to create these floral patterns. Check it out. It’s amazing.

F News: From the very first day you walked into today, how has your studio practice changed?

KD: Honestly, this is the work I submitted to get in. Right? And that’s the very first work I created when I came to SAIC. So you can kinda see the difference in the way I create, but there’s still the strong root and figuration. There’s been pushback from a lot of my advisors of me kind of pushing away from figuration. I’ve had questions as to why this figure is so important. That’s texture, the backgrounds, the materials, it’s doing all the things we’re trying to get out. So the cigarette isn’t really necessary. But I feel like as a Black woman, all my works, even though they may not intend to be political, there’s still a political statement being said. Just being a female painter’s political statement within itself.

If these figures that have been so long neglected in history, especially art history, why should I remove them? Yes, right now there’s a lot of that figuration going on, but there aren’t that many if you think about the spectrum of what art has been from the first 21st Century until now. That’s when they kinda started to get the recognition they deserve. But then it’s like, ‘Okay. We’re tired of seeing this. Do abstract. Do expressionism. Remove the figures.’ Why? Those figures mean something. They’re someone.

F News: Are there any other themes that I didn’t ask you about that are present in your work?

KT: A theme that’s very present in my work is that I’ve lost that missing time with family, that missing time with people. I feel like there’s always a search for connectivity in my work, like when I remove the figure and make it a more abstract version of the figure.

There’s a work that’s entitled “The All Fall.” It’s not like right now, but it is of four girls playing “Ring Around the Rosy,” but then one of them is obscured in like this mirror-like silhouette, where you can kinda see your reflection but disoriented. And there’s a sense of loss there. I feel like that kinda carries through on how it works subtly. So there’s also a sense of finding what’s missing.

A close-up portrait of Yukyeom Kim.

Yukyeom Kim, Art and Technology Studies

F News: What does your daily practice look like?

Yukyeom Kim: I am usually interested in making movement with some electronics. So yeah I make a lot of watercolor straws to make a mark of my emotions. So all of those things have become my material for my work.

F News: Whenever you’re in your studio, what are the influences that you use to make your work? I know you set your emotions, but is there anything else that you used to inspire you?

YK: I met a lot of performance people here, and they affect me a lot, I guess. I was interested in movement, and then they usually use their behavior as material for their work. I think human behavior represented in artwork could have the power to affect other people.

Kim’s piece about baby fever and the way babies use and are used by technology.

F News: Can you tell me a little bit about this piece?

YK: It surprised me, I have a baby fever. It’s a big baby fever. So I browsed a baby’s image a lot on the Internet, and then I saw the way people film their babies, and there’s a popular baby’s image and an unpopular baby’s image. So I was interested in what people expect from babies. I wanted to talk about expectations or the reason the baby should be born. My baby is learning other babies’ images. So it is a baby researching.

F News: How has your practice changed from the first day you came into your studio to today?

YK: I was a sculpture student before I got here. After I got into art and technology classes, I learned a lot of skills to make my works interactive. They can move, and this school taught me how to make sophisticated visual language with movement.

Mel Ramaker spinning fibers into yarn on a spinning wheel.

Mel Ramaker, Fibers

F News: Tell me a little bit about your daily studio practice.

Mel Ramaker: I focus a lot on slow craft. So I do a lot of knitting, a lot of crochet, and painting as well. So all the things that I do take a lot of time. In my studio, I work long hours just kind of working really close to the body — really small movements, with really small things and I want to use that to create bigger things as well.

F News: What influences you? What themes are in your work?

MR: I use a lot of themes of white conservatism, American Christianity, and the context of me growing up in that space, and what my actual experience with that was like. There’s also a lot about life and a lot about death — just a human human experience overall.

F News: How has your work changed from the very first day you stepped in your studio to today?

MR: Oh my gosh, it has changed so much honestly. I was previously a ceramicist and a painter, and I still love to do those things. But I came into the fiber department, and I’m self-taught in fiber. So it was definitely a new situation for me to learn technically all of these things. I came in and I did a lot of embroidery. I’m thinking a lot about things like religion and community and spirituality. But about halfway through the first semester, I found craft, crochet, knitting, and I literally never looked back; like, oh my god.

Crochet is amazing. So as you see behind you, everything is crochet now. So it’s a kind of a new and exciting world. I’m definitely thinking a lot about what it means to me because it is so new, And I’m just excited to grow and to learn new things and to see what else is out there.

F News: How do you source the fibers that you use and what ways do you like to go about getting the materials that you use?

MR: I really like to focus on long craft and I really enjoy taking the time, um, spend on making the thing from conception from the beginning through to the end. So I spin a lot of my yarn. I see. I get fiber, different types of fiber. I work in wool a lot right now. This [indicates] is TENCEL. It’s a wood cellulose fiber. Then I either dye it myself or it comes dyed. And then I ply it, and then I crochet it, and then I assemble it.

I really enjoy the process of just making. It seems to me that making a thing is more important to me than the finished product.

 

Chelsea Bighorn, Fibers

A close-up portrait of Chelsea Bighorn.

F News: Can you introduce yourself and tell me a little bit about your daily practice in your studio?

Chelsea Bighorn: I’m Lakota, Dakota, Shoshone Paiute, and Irish American. Currently, my practice focuses a lot on bringing forward adornment such as fringe and beadwork.

F News: Can you elaborate a little bit on adornment? What does it mean to you?

CB: When I think of it, I think of all of the extra things that are added within fashion to our clothing or specifically regalia, like powwow regalia, powwow dances. Fringe has played a really big part in that. You see fringe jackets, fringe dresses, And last year I was doing a project in micro macro, and we had to pick some kind of textile and I chose fringe. So I’m looking at the history of fringe, how it was used, and in dances how it’s used to emphasize body movements and I find it really interesting when it’s just stationary, not moving when it’s meant to be this thing that is active.

F News: Can you tell me a little bit more about the themes that you are exploring in your work?

CB: I currently am rediscovering a lot of my Native American heritage. I didn’t grow up traditional. So a lot of my work is based around that, Native American art, textiles, beadwork.

I’m working on another piece that is also kind of about movement and sound. It’s this one. [Indicates] Again, when it’s stationary, it’s just an object. But then when it comes off the wall and it moves, it creates this really amazing sound. Um, and when it can be worn on the body, you know, it drapes like fabric.

Bighorn’s piece blends sound and movement into a fabric-like sculpture.

F News: Are there any artists or any books that you’re reading or enjoying?

CB: I’m reading “Indigenous London” right now. It’s about indigenous peoples from the Americas who traveled to England; it’s about their experiences, their lives there. I’m also reading for fun, “Never Whistle at Night.” It’s an indigenous anthology of horror stories.

F News: How has your practice changed from the first day you walked in your studio to today?

CB: Oh my gosh. A lot. I didn’t come in as a fiber artist. Working with fabric and stuff is completely new to me. Still don’t know how to sew as a second year. I hand sew. I don’t use a machine. I mean, this is, like, one of the first things I started here. And, I mean, you just start, you know, playing with things in your studio and messing around, and all the classes here really allowed me to work with a lot of different materials. It pushed my practice to where it is now, which is great.

Xiaowen Bao showing off a handmade garment.

Xiaowen Bao, Fashion

F News: Tell me a little bit about your daily practice in your studio.

Xiaowen Bao (Bonnie): I do the garments, accessories, and I also do some fabric modification. My work is about transformation. Like, the transformation from the very traditional Asian Mongolian costume to a very modern contemporary clothes because I’m a Mongolian, but I don’t speak Mongolian, and I don’t live in that lifestyle. So it’s like a garment version of me. For my second year, I’m going to do this new stuff I’m working on, but it’s just very prototype. It’s a mimic of Chanel, and I’m going to incorporate some motors.

F News: What themes are in your work or what are you inspired by?

XB: I think I’m more inspired by very abstract things, what happens in the world, what happens in contemporary practice, and the impact from the world on me. So it’s kind of like a reflection and my influence on the world. My work is a reflection to the current happenings of the world.

F News: How has your work changed since your first day at SAIC?

XB: I’m more focused on the outcomes. I have transferred my major from finance to fashion design, so a very big transition. Before I focused more on the process; how does it go, and the reason behind my concept. And now I have more attention to focus on the outcomes and the visions. And I want it to be more obvious what’s behind it.

F News: What has inspired you at SAIC?

XB: I’m going to use some motors. I just saw a student using a robot to interact with people. She has them walk to the camera, and the camera will interact with them. And it’s like a mimic of AI, I think. I think it’s very interesting.

 

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On the Eve of My Graduation

By Alumni, SAIC

Illustration by Fah Prayottavekit.

In 1988, on the eve of his graduation, John Flaxman (MFA 1988) wrote a letter that would come to greet students as they entered the library with Flaxman’s name at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

His observations have proved timeless, and I’ve been thinking about them a lot.

“If you wish to pass a class at SAIC you will pass,” the letter reads. I can attest: this is still true.

“I am losing my teenage power; a power based on confusion, protest, and outward blame that ultimately turned to inner judgment. An endless cycle. We recreate ourselves again and again in all our tasks,” he writes.

He grapples with perceived corruption and notions of power, stating, “I thought I knew it all. The tale-tell chip on my shoulder ‘Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster … and if you gaze into the abyss the abyss gazes also into you. It is my lifelong pursuit to burn out the blackness within me with the bright light of creation.”

The letter ends with the idea that love is the ethic that can address all of these concerns: “Love conquers fear. I suspect love and creation are the same,” he writes.

This ethic of love is still everywhere I look at SAIC.

As a staff writer at F Newsmagazine, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about SAIC as an institution. This year we’ve written about speaking truth to power, the war in Palestine, our hopes for a new school president, and the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion initiatives the school has put forth.

Now that I’m preparing to graduate, I wanted to reflect on how things have changed or stayed the same since we initially published some of these articles, and what it all means for the future.

In “So Do You Wanna Collaborate” (Oct. 2023), we discussed how no individual can solve the multiple crises in society alone. No one artist can truly create structural change solely from without. Collective change needs to be consistently located within institutions in American society.

Prior to my arrival at SAIC, students advocated for significant structural changes including change in the administration, change in demographics of the student body, change in the physical spaces.

In “Entering a New Era” (Nov. 2023), we explained how the school’s power structure is such that student protest drives creation and the office of the president is responsive. The school structure is such that any student-led initiative will always be short-lived because our lives as students are ephemeral. We graduate before we see what our actions have brought to this institution.

Collective change is consistently the role of institutions in American society and yet, SAIC as an institution has not always been helpful in fostering a collaborative environment. In “Anti Racism Committee: Political Theater or True Commitment to DEI?” (March 2024), we examined steps the school has taken and still needs to take to meet the varying needs of all the school’s stakeholders.

The office of the outgoing president, Elissa Tenny, responded by stating, “The work of making SAIC more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and anti-racist will continue, and it will rely on responsive, collaborative work across the institution, rather than follow a particular, pre-existing template.”

With this in mind, I spoke to Dr. Sekile Nzinga to understand how her office would approach the task.

Nzinga said that she believes in structural change and intends to build in three key areas: co-curricular, structural, and academic.

“I inherited the initiative that President Tenny started. I am excited to have an opportunity for us to connect and engage further. Reading about race and racism gives us a space to develop a shared understanding and shared analysis, and it can give us a chance to build community,” Nzinga said.

She said that she believes engagement and action can take place across all kinds of identities and experiences.

“I love a common read concept [where the school community reads a single foundational text together] and I plan on building on this initiative next year. I plan on working with the Office of Student Affairs so the common read becomes a part of our students’ welcoming experience. Especially given that our students are coming from so many places — we have 85 countries represented at SAIC,” she said.

Book clubs and study groups provide an opportunity to discuss critical work, Nzinga said. She wants to incorporate the common read into the school’s curriculum.

“Common connection is an important part of community building,” Nzinga said.

Students’ demands for change go beyond our campus: protest and organizing around the ongoing wars in Sudan, Ukraine, and Palestine require response from leadership. We discussed that in “Students Affected by Genocide Need All of Us” (April 2024), which demanded more resources in the face of worldwide devastation.

Everyone at SAIC works for each other — there is no one that attends the school who is not served by their fellow students and alumni. But we, too, will fade as the next group comes to make their mark. In this way, our protest is a part of a repeated cycle. If we don’t recognize this, we risk the danger of recreating the conditions that we criticize.

Nzinga said she has an open door to help address student concerns and wants to work as a partner.=

“I have some broad institution-wide goals. I am pleased that the SAIC community fought to have my office report to the president, which allows me to partner with other across the school

— in academic affairs, in the school’s operations and in the co-curricular experience. Each is important to bring about institutional change,” Nzinga said.

The truth is that nothing is pure in this world. In the same way that Flaxman recognized his life-long pursuit to rid the “blackness with the light of creation,” we as artists pursue what is sublime and beautiful. This need for utopia leads us in circles — the Latin to English-translation of “utopia” is, “The good place exists nowhere.”

We live in an imperfect world and we ourselves are imperfect beings. We will always live within contradictions.

One such contradiction present in the face of working in a museum is the wealth and the theft that created such an institution, to begin with, as explained in the article “Gatekeepers of Heritage,” published in October 2023. The museum is eager to catalog the protest once it is over, but it does not actively engage in the conflict as it occurs.

The money of the institution is implicated in the funding that creates instruments of war. The artifacts that are on display are there as a result of sordid acts. Often, I hear passing comments from international students regarding the contradictions that create the place we all occupy. There’s a kind of contemptuous glee in declaring that Americans are unaware of how corrupt they are.

I counter such statements with this: everyone is aware, but a neat and perfect answer has not been found. We can only find beauty if we accept that nothing is beautiful and instead find joy in the process. This is called growth; it is called democracy; it is called compromise.

The work of finding compromise is only for those who are willing to grow. In the age of the internet and Artificial Intelligence, it is easy to critique from a comfortable distance, but socially engaged art is about action and documentation. Every step taken to solve one piece of a tangled web is a step that will help you grow and in turn will help others grow as well.

Nzinga said she believes that her role is to support students, faculty, staff, and the administration as we grow as an institution.

“I am also here to remind us that we deserve to live, to rest, and that we deserve joy,” she said.

But even after all of SAIC’s efforts to advance DEI, I find I can still walk into a room and be the only one — the only Black person, the only woman, or the only mother in the room. These systems of exclusion are still in place — they are baked into our cultural institutions.

I’m curious to explore how we can be a part of a collective effort to name and remove barriers so that all of those folks who are underrepresented in higher education can thrive. Many institutions have made commitments to advancing  DEI and I see them as accountability partners.  Whether you are a student or in administration — we are on the same journey.

 

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SAIC Students Demand ‘No Happy Graduation While Gaza is Under Attack’

By Featured, News, SAIC

The typical graduation day at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago features speeches, awards, and diplomas, and is colored by the creativity of its students. But the commencement ceremony on May 20 at the Wintrust Arena took on a different tone.

This year, some students used the graduation ceremony as a place to protest. The students said they were protesting SAIC’s refusal to be transparent about and divest any money going towards supporting Israel, with emphasis on  SAIC’s ties to the Crown family.

Instagram story post from @saic_pl showing their commencement program which shares information about the arrests made on May 4, 2024, at the Art Institute Garden in the top right, instructions for different forms of protest students can engage in the bottom right, and information about the Crown family.

As names were called, more than a dozen graduating students walked across the stage, refused to shake hands with President Elissa Tenny, and tore up yellow papers with an image of a crown with nukes and bullets referring to the Crown family’s ownership stake with weapons manufacturer General Dynamics.

An image of the yellow flyers torn up by students on stage was posted to the @saic_pl Instagram showing the crown illustration with instructions to call for divestment on stage.

Some students garnered keffiyehs, Palestinian flags, and stoles that read “Disclose investment.”  These students turned their backs to the administrative faculty on stage, while they sat in the audience.

Image of the stage after commencement covered in the torn yellow flyers of the crown with commentary from @saic_pl on their Instagram story.

Marisa, a graduate who requested to be identified by first name, has been very active in the SAIC community during her time as a student, speaking up for herself and her peers. Marisa participated in the graduation protest by walking across the stage and tearing one of the yellow papers.

“One of my favorite things about graduation was rewatching the live stream and paying attention to admin’s faces while we protested. It showed us exactly who the problems are. The school’s social media lacked any presence of our support for Palestine, again displaying SAIC’s lack of empathy and justice. Elissa Tenny and her followers only care about their reputation as well as their monetary value,” Marisa shared with F Newsmagazine.

This call for action continued after commencement with a rally outside the arena.

Post commencement rally flier shared by @saic_pl Instagram story.

These initiatives were facilitated by student-run Instagram accounts @saic_pl and @thepeoplesartinstitute, with support from education and cultural workers in Chicago @eduworkers4palichi and @culturalworkers4palichi.

The Instagram pages shared the same post in the morning the day of the commencement with the cover image of the crown paired with bloody handprints reading, “BLOOD ON THE CROWNS NO HAPPY GRADUATION WHILE GAZA IS UNDER ATTACK” on a black background. The rest of the post featured eight slides with more on the Crown Family, their alleged contributions to the war in Gaza, and their relationship to SAIC. Following this post were multiple Instagram stories from @saic_pl and @thepeoplesartinstitute with more instructions on the various forms of protest students could engage in at the ceremony.

Slide one of nine collaboratively posted on the Instagram pages of @saic_pl, @thepeoplesartinstitute, @eduworkers4palichi, and @culturalworkers4palichi showing illustrations of bloody hand prints and a crown with nukes and ammunition reading, in all caps, “Blood on the crowns no happy graduation while Gaza is under attack.”

“Celebrating this milestone from an institution that sources funds from General Dynamics feels sickening, hypocritical, and negates what we believe it truly means to be an artist. How can we celebrate graduation when every single university in Gaza has been destroyed? How can we look towards our future when so many students in Gaza have been robbed of any sense of future?” reads a portion of the shared post description.

SAIC students are only a portion of the many college students fighting for Palestinian liberation who are continuing to speak and protest through the rest of graduation season.

SAIC Administration was unable to provide a response before our deadline.

This is a developing story.

 

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Senior Year Part 6: And This is Where L Leave You

By Comics, Featured, Featured Comics

Panel One: A torso shot of Ellie walking to the right side of the page. Their backpack is full of comics. They say, “I’ve been thinking about how I would end this strip since before it started. About the ‘wisdom’ I would impart on current and future art students. But now that I'm here. I'm not sure what to say.”

Panel Two: A zoomed out shot of Ellie Walking out the doors of the 280 building. They say, “Because what I’ve really learned is that I know nothing,”

Panel Three: The shot zooms out even further as Ellie walks away from the building and says, “And I love that.” They continue, “But here’s some stuff I think it’s good to keep in mind.”

Panel Four: Ellie makes their way onto the sidewalks and is now walking towards the reader. They say, “Stay curious. Find ways to keep art exciting even if you hate the assignment. You’re the only person walking out of here with the work you’ve made. The Lakeview 14th floor gender neutral bathrooms are good to cry in. Use everything you can get Access too. Find people that make you excited to make things and hold onto them. Show up for each other. Bring your own lunch. Trust me.”

Panel Five: A close up shot of Ellie casually saluting the reader. They say, “Most importantly though, you are not a machine! Taking care of yourself is non-negotiable!” They continue, “Alright I'll get off my soapbox now. Have fun, play safe, and I’ll catch you later.”

Transcript

Panel One: A torso shot of Ellie walking to the right side of the page. Their backpack is full of comics. They say, “I’ve been thinking about how I would end this strip since before it started. About the ‘wisdom’ I would impart on current and future art students. But now that I’m here. I’m not sure what to say.”

Panel Two: A zoomed out shot of Ellie Walking out the doors of the 280 building. They say, “Because what I’ve really learned is that I know nothing,”

Panel Three: The shot zooms out even further as Ellie walks away from the building and says, “And I love that.” They continue, “But here’s some stuff I think it’s good to keep in mind.”

Panel Four: Ellie makes their way onto the sidewalks and is now walking towards the reader. They say, “Stay curious. Find ways to keep art exciting even if you hate the assignment. You’re the only person walking out of here with the work you’ve made. The Lakeview 14th floor gender neutral bathrooms are good to cry in. Use everything you can get Access too. Find people that make you excited to make things and hold onto them. Show up for each other. Bring your own lunch. Trust me.”

Panel Five: A close up shot of Ellie casually saluting the reader. They say, “Most importantly though, you are not a machine! Taking care of yourself is non-negotiable!” They continue, “Alright I’ll get off my soapbox now. Have fun, play safe, and I’ll catch you later.”

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Senior Year Part 5: ‘The Home Stretch’

By Comics, Featured Comics

This is a single panel comic. Ellie is sitting with one hand up scratching their head, their body is melting and turning into goo starting from their mid chest. Their feet and boots have melted full off of their body and are sitting in a pile on the floor as their legs drip.  They say, “How am I doing? Yeahhh… I’m a bit busy. You know, like, BFA show, class, capstone, work, art sale, therapy, thinking about post grad plans, emotionally preparing for student debt, sleeping, eating. It's a lot. But it's cool.” Their speech slowly starts to melt and fall towards the puddle of their shoes as they continue, “It's a lot but, I’m Making good work you know? It’ll be over soon.”

Transcript

This is a single panel comic. Ellie is sitting with one hand up scratching their head, their body is melting and turning into goo starting from their mid chest. Their feet and boots have melted full off of their body and are sitting in a pile on the floor as their legs drip. 

They say, “How am I doing? Yeahhh… I’m a bit busy. You know, like, BFA show, class, capstone, work, art sale, therapy, thinking about post grad plans, emotionally preparing for student debt, sleeping, eating. It’s a lot. But it’s cool.” Their speech slowly starts to melt and fall towards the puddle of their shoes as they continue, “It’s a lot but, I’m Making good work you know? It’ll be over soon.”

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Life of Sheena: Part 3

By Comics, Featured Comics

PAGE ONE

Panel One: Fantasy world Sheena travels on a boat.

STARR (cap): “I doubt I could have ever lived a normal life.”

Panel Two:  Sheena travels to the Eiffel Tower 

STARR (cap): “Even with normal eyes”

Panel Three: Sheena travels to Fushimi Inari Taisha in Japan.

STARR (cap): “I have always been an outsider”

Panel Four:  Sheena travels to the El Castillo pyramid in Mexico

STARR (cap): “And outsiders don’t tend to do normal things”

PAGE TWO 

Panel One:  Paper collage of Starr.

STARR (cap): “Our lives always end up as a collage”

Panel Two:  Starr huddles with her band backstage

STARR (cap): “In that way, we get to live the most”

Panel Three:  The group breaks the huddle, live with energy

STARR (cap): "We exist in a thousand pieces"

STARR (cap, cont.): "And we get to choose how to build ourselves”

Panel Four: The band all make it to the stage

STARR (cap): “And I’d choose this every time”

Transcript

PAGE ONE

Panel One: Fantasy world Sheena travels on a boat.

STARR (cap): “I doubt I could have ever lived a normal life.”

Panel Two:  Sheena travels to the Eiffel Tower 

STARR (cap): “Even with normal eyes”

Panel Three: Sheena travels to Fushimi Inari Taisha in Japan.

STARR (cap): “I have always been an outsider”

Panel Four:  Sheena travels to the El Castillo pyramid in Mexico

STARR (cap): “And outsiders don’t tend to do normal things”

PAGE TWO 

Panel One:  Paper collage of Starr.

STARR (cap): “Our lives always end up as a collage”

Panel Two:  Starr huddles with her band backstage

STARR (cap): “In that way, we get to live the most”

Panel Three:  The group breaks the huddle, live with energy

STARR (cap): “We exist in a thousand pieces”

STARR (cap, cont.): “And we get to choose how to build ourselves”

Panel Four: The band all make it to the stage

STARR (cap): “And I’d choose this every time”

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Life of Sheena: Part 2

By Comics, Featured Comics

PAGE ONE Panel One:  Sheena Glamm beats up the guy who stabbed her STARR (cap): “Sometimes I wish things had turned out differently” Panel Two:  Sheena has a baby. STARR (cap): “Maybe I could’ve had kids…” Panel Three: Old Sheena holds a baby up, next to a young man and woman. STARR (cap): “...or grandkids” Panel Four.: Starr walks through the bus, waving to Karl and Dave. STARR (cap): “Not that I mind being the mythic aunt of the Lynes” Panel Five: Starr puts her hands in her pocket, walking with her head down STARR (cap): “I just wonder” PAGE TWO Panel One:  Old Sheena watches as shoulders run in a vast yard STARR (cap): “What would it be like to see your prodigy, running around?” Panel Two:  Shot of two of the kids, who look like Sheena STARR (cap): “To see yourself in them?” Panel Three:  Blur of the grandkids as they run faster STARR (cap): “To live in their blood?” Panel Four:  Further abstraction STARR (cap): “Would this be a normal life?”

Transcript

PAGE ONE

Panel One:  Sheena Glamm beats up the guy who stabbed her

STARR (cap): “Sometimes I wish things had turned out differently”

Panel Two:  Sheena has a baby.

STARR (cap): “Maybe I could’ve had kids…”

Panel Three: Old Sheena holds a baby up, next to a young man and woman.

STARR (cap): “…or grandkids”

Panel Four.: Starr walks through the bus, waving to Karl and Dave.

STARR (cap): “Not that I mind being the mythic aunt of the Lynes”

Panel Five: Starr puts her hands in her pocket, walking with her head down

STARR (cap): “I just wonder”

PAGE TWO

Panel One:  Old Sheena watches as shoulders run in a vast yard

STARR (cap): “What would it be like to see your prodigy, running around?”

Panel Two:  Shot of two of the kids, who look like Sheena

STARR (cap): “To see yourself in them?”

Panel Three:  Blur of the grandkids as they run faster

STARR (cap): “To live in their blood?”

Panel Four:  Further abstraction

STARR (cap): “Would this be a normal life?”

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Life of Sheena: Part 1

By Comics, Featured, Featured Comics

PAGE ONE

Panel One: Starr stands in a cramped tour bus bathroom with her glasses off, surrounded by her bandmates’ face and makeup products, holding an open jar of hair gel.

STARR (cap): “Today, I’m turning 70.” 

Panel Two: Starr spikes her hair

STARR (cap): “I know, right?”

Panel Three: Starr puts her glasses on

STARR (cap): “These sunglasses hide a lot, but if you look really close you can see lines on my face.”

Panel Four: Zoom into her glasses.

STARR (cap): “But you have to look very close.”

Panel Five: Zoom in to eye closeup, with the mesh sunglasses pattern and lines and creases on her face (circular panel)

STARR (cap): “With a magnifying glass.”

PAGE TWO

Panel One: Star-shaped panel with mesh pattern.  

STARR (cap): “I don’t think anyone connected the dots

Panel Two: Shot of Sheena Glamm, Starr's former persona, posing with her band, including Kenji Davenport

STARR (cap): “But I was 20 in 1973 and that makes me 70 now” 

Panel Three: Shot of Starr with her current band --Bébé, Karl, and Dave-- in a similar photo.

STARR (cap): “Of course, I’m not going to tell anyone”

Panel Four: Back to Starr getting ready in the bathroom, applying lipstick.

STARR (cap): “I’m gonna keep it all to myself”

Transcript

PAGE ONE

Panel One: Starr stands in a cramped tour bus bathroom with her glasses off, surrounded by her bandmates’ face and makeup products, holding an open jar of hair gel.

STARR (cap): “Today, I’m turning 70.” 

Panel Two: Starr spikes her hair

STARR (cap): “I know, right?”

Panel Three: Starr puts her glasses on

STARR (cap): “These sunglasses hide a lot, but if you look really close you can see lines on my face.”

Panel Four: Zoom into her glasses.

STARR (cap): “But you have to look very close.”

Panel Five: Zoom in to eye closeup, with the mesh sunglasses pattern and lines and creases on her face (circular panel)

STARR (cap): “With a magnifying glass.”

PAGE TWO

Panel One: Star-shaped panel with mesh pattern.  

STARR (cap): “I don’t think anyone connected the dots

Panel Two: Shot of Sheena Glamm, Starr’s former persona, posing with her band, including Kenji Davenport

STARR (cap): “But I was 20 in 1973 and that makes me 70 now” 

Panel Three: Shot of Starr with her current band –Bébé, Karl, and Dave– in a similar photo.

STARR (cap): “Of course, I’m not going to tell anyone”

Panel Four: Back to Starr getting ready in the bathroom, applying lipstick.

STARR (cap): “I’m gonna keep it all to myself”

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Wild and Whimsical — No Strings Attached!

By Arts & Culture, Featured, Photo Essay, SAIC

Shoe String Puppet Cabaret’s poster designed by Ayla Scott advertising the Cabaret event.

Smut, Drag, and puppets! On Sunday, April 28, 2024, Shoe String Puppets hosted a cabaret show at the Color Club in Elston Chicago. “Shoe String Puppet Cabaret” featured eight acts and over 20 performers.

F Newsmagazine asked the Shoe String Puppets group about their formation and success.

Mya Nicole Jones: Who are the founders of Shoe String Puppets?

Shoe String Puppets: Shoe String Puppets is a small puppet collective started by Sophia Tarducci, Ethan Simone, and Soph Schiavone. We met at SAIC’s puppetry and performance class taught by Blair Thomas. We just happened to be randomly assigned to a group project together and it just took off from there! That was about a year ago. We just seem like we have really great chemistry and creative direction together, mostly it’s just fun to make puppet shows with your friends!

MNJ: How did it feel to plan the Cabaret show at the Color Club?

SSP: As a group, we’ve done quite a few puppet performances together, but usually we are a part of a performance showcase. This time we had a show and we wanted somewhere to perform it, so we decided to just make an event. It took us a couple of months to plan, getting the venue, creating applications for performers, rehearsing, etc. Honestly, a lot of the work ended up happening the day of [the cabaret]. We’ve never done anything like this so the actual setup and performance was a bit of a learning curve. But everyone was so patient and excited. We are so grateful to all the performers, all the shows were so incredible and they really made the night!

MNJ: What is the future of Shoe String Puppets?

SSP: We are always thinking about shows and fun puppet ideas so we definitely have some things in the works. We would love to do some outdoor puppet stuff this summer and we really love doing cool collaborative projects. We believe this is just the start for Shoe String Puppets!

Drag performer Mads Reardon performs “Dog Show Fancy” as the opening act. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Marianna Gallegos-Garcia’s multi-puppet and prop performance of “Za Ha Ha.” Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Agnotti and Tanima use their bodies as puppets performing as wildly cellular clowns. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Fanny the Consumer, the puppet, is being controlled from behind by Daniella Loza, Alejandro Loza, Orion Welacha-Garcia, and Alex Azul. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Performer and writer Suz stands at the microphone engaging with the audience reading a choose your own adventure smut story. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Emma Johnson shares the history of Groundhog’s Day while donning a crafted crowned groundhog head. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Jocelyn Rainwater, Fawn Bell, and Rowan Davis present a fairytale with a barter, a bunny puppet, and, of course, a giant articulated head. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Shoe String Puppets’ very own Nathan puppet, controlled by Sophia Tarducci, Ethan Simone, and Soph Schiavone, speaks with three spirits, played by the same people controlling him. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Closing bows with the Cabaret performers and team. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

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Something Kinky This Way Comes

By Arts & Culture, Featured, Photo Essay

LA&M Archivist Mel Leverich carefully flips through a large folder of photographs documenting kinky events. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

“This belongs in a museum.” The famous Indiana Jones quote probably makes you think of ancient artifacts and masterpiece paintings. But have you ever seen a ball gag or a spanking bench displayed in a museum?

The Leather Archives & Museum, housed in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood, is a living legacy of fetish culture. Through a combination of its archive, museum, library, and auditorium, the LA&M accomplishes its mission statement of, “making leather, kink, BDSM, and fetish accessible through research, preservation, education, and community engagement.”

A wall of fetish gear includes collars, chains, floggers, and gags with signs inviting museum-goers to touch. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

The LA&M’s archival collection is open for anyone to use for research, and archivist Mel Leverich is there to help you navigate the collection that ranges from fetish gear to zines to photographs to leather jackets to a massive collection of pins and patches. The archives house materials from the 1950s to today.

Leverich walks through the archives of the museum. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

“The LA&M is one of a kind. There is no other,” said SAIC professor Kirin Wachter-Grene and former LA&M visiting scholar, researching Black women’s historical, manifold involvement with leather, fetish, and kink communities

Leather is a subculture coming out of gay men’s motorcycle clubs in the 1950s and ‘60s, but it has evolved a great deal over time. Kink is an umbrella term that identifies anything sexual that isn’t within the realm of normative sex, and fetishes are about the enjoyment of a particular experience or object, including leather. BDSM is a kink but it also refers to sexual relationships engaged in powerplay. “These communities historically have been highly marginalized and suppressed and censored. If you’re kinky, if you’re involved in these communities, there’s not a lot of places where you can express that without being censored in some way,” said Leverich.

Hanging on the walls of the LA&M auditorium are large murals painted by Dom “Etienne” Orejudos, created for and preserved from Chicago gay bars in the mid-20th century. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

“Kink, BDSM, fetish, leather — I mean those are some of the ways that people live every day expressing themselves, sexually and radically in relation to others and to self. To me, it’s just absolutely devastating to think about that material living in darkness forever or disappearing,” said Wachter-Grene. She added, “That’s why it’s so important because if the Leather Archives wasn’t collecting this stuff, no one would.”

The LA&M was founded by Chuck Renslow and Tony DeBlase. Renslow was a local LGBTQ+ businessman, gay activist, and photographer. Meanwhile, DeBlase, who worked at the Field Museum, founded DungeonMaster Magazine and designed the leather pride flag. Leverich explained that the LA&M started as a small shop front on Clark Street, and quickly outgrew the space, moving into its current location in 1996.

“It was founded in the ‘90s by people who were donating their friends’ and lovers’ materials who were people who died from AIDS related complications at that time when it was just a plague against queer people who the government was more than happy to see wiped off the face of the Earth. It was a way of honoring a life,” said Wachter-Grene.

The library of the LA&M provides a free space for anyone to dive into queer history, pulp fiction, and erotic zines. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

Leverich explained that their favorite type of material in the archive is personal accounts. Leverich also stressed that when people donate materials today, they should not overlook that emails, texts, and social media are equally important forms of documentation.

Despite leather clubs being started by white, gay men, the leather and kink community is for anyone.

“There’s a very strong active women’s leather community. There are people of all identities involved in the leather community. There are leather clubs specifically by and for trans people.  There are leather clubs specifically by and for people of color, and, obviously, tons of clubs that are open to everybody,” said Leverich.

A wall of women’s leather vests displayed in the museum shows off two key elements of the leather community: the collecting of pins and patches from events, friends, and clubs; and the competitive leather titles community members can win as part of charity events. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

The museum in particular works to highlight the many different identities within the kink community. For example, one exhibit, which Wachter-Grene made a point to highlight in her interview, is dedicated to and about Mistress Velvet, a Chicagoan Black, non-binary dominatrix, activist, and social worker as a way of honoring her life after her passing in 2021. The museum regularly spotlights modern LGBTQ+ artists’ work and has two important spaces geared toward community building and learning. Their non-lending library is free to the public and has books on queer and kinky histories, graphic novels, zines, and an entire back wall of pulp fiction erotica. Additionally, they host regular monthly events including kink classes and film screenings in their auditorium.

Correction: The print edition misidentified that Kirin Wachter-Grene guest curated the Leather Archives and Museum exhibit dedicated to Mistress Velvet. Wachter-Grene interviewed Mistress Velvet in an issue of “The Black Scholar” which she guest-edited. 

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Explorations in blue

By Comics, Featured Comics

Transcript

Panel One: A young girl sets off for her new journey.

Panel Two: The girl wanders in front of the various path entrances.

Panel Three: The girl breaks the balance sometimes while she struggles to maintain the balance.

Panel Four: The girl stands at the matrix of the different paths.

Panel Five: The girl doesn’t drink but stumbles along her journey.

Panel Six: The girl wants to numb, to ease.

Panel Seven: The girl escapes along the journey, folded and unfolded.

Panel Eight: The girl reflects on her experience and reorganizes her thoughts.

Panel Nine: The girl hangs out with her friend to enjoy the journey in the infinity.

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