Search F News...

Senior Year Part 6: And This is Where L Leave You

By Comics, Featured, Featured Comics

Panel One: A torso shot of Ellie walking to the right side of the page. Their backpack is full of comics. They say, “I’ve been thinking about how I would end this strip since before it started. About the ‘wisdom’ I would impart on current and future art students. But now that I'm here. I'm not sure what to say.”

Panel Two: A zoomed out shot of Ellie Walking out the doors of the 280 building. They say, “Because what I’ve really learned is that I know nothing,”

Panel Three: The shot zooms out even further as Ellie walks away from the building and says, “And I love that.” They continue, “But here’s some stuff I think it’s good to keep in mind.”

Panel Four: Ellie makes their way onto the sidewalks and is now walking towards the reader. They say, “Stay curious. Find ways to keep art exciting even if you hate the assignment. You’re the only person walking out of here with the work you’ve made. The Lakeview 14th floor gender neutral bathrooms are good to cry in. Use everything you can get Access too. Find people that make you excited to make things and hold onto them. Show up for each other. Bring your own lunch. Trust me.”

Panel Five: A close up shot of Ellie casually saluting the reader. They say, “Most importantly though, you are not a machine! Taking care of yourself is non-negotiable!” They continue, “Alright I'll get off my soapbox now. Have fun, play safe, and I’ll catch you later.”

Transcript

Panel One: A torso shot of Ellie walking to the right side of the page. Their backpack is full of comics. They say, “I’ve been thinking about how I would end this strip since before it started. About the ‘wisdom’ I would impart on current and future art students. But now that I’m here. I’m not sure what to say.”

Panel Two: A zoomed out shot of Ellie Walking out the doors of the 280 building. They say, “Because what I’ve really learned is that I know nothing,”

Panel Three: The shot zooms out even further as Ellie walks away from the building and says, “And I love that.” They continue, “But here’s some stuff I think it’s good to keep in mind.”

Panel Four: Ellie makes their way onto the sidewalks and is now walking towards the reader. They say, “Stay curious. Find ways to keep art exciting even if you hate the assignment. You’re the only person walking out of here with the work you’ve made. The Lakeview 14th floor gender neutral bathrooms are good to cry in. Use everything you can get Access too. Find people that make you excited to make things and hold onto them. Show up for each other. Bring your own lunch. Trust me.”

Panel Five: A close up shot of Ellie casually saluting the reader. They say, “Most importantly though, you are not a machine! Taking care of yourself is non-negotiable!” They continue, “Alright I’ll get off my soapbox now. Have fun, play safe, and I’ll catch you later.”

See More

Senior Year Part 5: ‘The Home Stretch’

By Comics, Featured Comics

This is a single panel comic. Ellie is sitting with one hand up scratching their head, their body is melting and turning into goo starting from their mid chest. Their feet and boots have melted full off of their body and are sitting in a pile on the floor as their legs drip.  They say, “How am I doing? Yeahhh… I’m a bit busy. You know, like, BFA show, class, capstone, work, art sale, therapy, thinking about post grad plans, emotionally preparing for student debt, sleeping, eating. It's a lot. But it's cool.” Their speech slowly starts to melt and fall towards the puddle of their shoes as they continue, “It's a lot but, I’m Making good work you know? It’ll be over soon.”

Transcript

This is a single panel comic. Ellie is sitting with one hand up scratching their head, their body is melting and turning into goo starting from their mid chest. Their feet and boots have melted full off of their body and are sitting in a pile on the floor as their legs drip. 

They say, “How am I doing? Yeahhh… I’m a bit busy. You know, like, BFA show, class, capstone, work, art sale, therapy, thinking about post grad plans, emotionally preparing for student debt, sleeping, eating. It’s a lot. But it’s cool.” Their speech slowly starts to melt and fall towards the puddle of their shoes as they continue, “It’s a lot but, I’m Making good work you know? It’ll be over soon.”

See More

Life of Sheena: Part 3

By Comics, Featured Comics

PAGE ONE

Panel One: Fantasy world Sheena travels on a boat.

STARR (cap): “I doubt I could have ever lived a normal life.”

Panel Two:  Sheena travels to the Eiffel Tower 

STARR (cap): “Even with normal eyes”

Panel Three: Sheena travels to Fushimi Inari Taisha in Japan.

STARR (cap): “I have always been an outsider”

Panel Four:  Sheena travels to the El Castillo pyramid in Mexico

STARR (cap): “And outsiders don’t tend to do normal things”

PAGE TWO 

Panel One:  Paper collage of Starr.

STARR (cap): “Our lives always end up as a collage”

Panel Two:  Starr huddles with her band backstage

STARR (cap): “In that way, we get to live the most”

Panel Three:  The group breaks the huddle, live with energy

STARR (cap): "We exist in a thousand pieces"

STARR (cap, cont.): "And we get to choose how to build ourselves”

Panel Four: The band all make it to the stage

STARR (cap): “And I’d choose this every time”

Transcript

PAGE ONE

Panel One: Fantasy world Sheena travels on a boat.

STARR (cap): “I doubt I could have ever lived a normal life.”

Panel Two:  Sheena travels to the Eiffel Tower 

STARR (cap): “Even with normal eyes”

Panel Three: Sheena travels to Fushimi Inari Taisha in Japan.

STARR (cap): “I have always been an outsider”

Panel Four:  Sheena travels to the El Castillo pyramid in Mexico

STARR (cap): “And outsiders don’t tend to do normal things”

PAGE TWO 

Panel One:  Paper collage of Starr.

STARR (cap): “Our lives always end up as a collage”

Panel Two:  Starr huddles with her band backstage

STARR (cap): “In that way, we get to live the most”

Panel Three:  The group breaks the huddle, live with energy

STARR (cap): “We exist in a thousand pieces”

STARR (cap, cont.): “And we get to choose how to build ourselves”

Panel Four: The band all make it to the stage

STARR (cap): “And I’d choose this every time”

See More

Life of Sheena: Part 2

By Comics, Featured Comics

PAGE ONE Panel One:  Sheena Glamm beats up the guy who stabbed her STARR (cap): “Sometimes I wish things had turned out differently” Panel Two:  Sheena has a baby. STARR (cap): “Maybe I could’ve had kids…” Panel Three: Old Sheena holds a baby up, next to a young man and woman. STARR (cap): “...or grandkids” Panel Four.: Starr walks through the bus, waving to Karl and Dave. STARR (cap): “Not that I mind being the mythic aunt of the Lynes” Panel Five: Starr puts her hands in her pocket, walking with her head down STARR (cap): “I just wonder” PAGE TWO Panel One:  Old Sheena watches as shoulders run in a vast yard STARR (cap): “What would it be like to see your prodigy, running around?” Panel Two:  Shot of two of the kids, who look like Sheena STARR (cap): “To see yourself in them?” Panel Three:  Blur of the grandkids as they run faster STARR (cap): “To live in their blood?” Panel Four:  Further abstraction STARR (cap): “Would this be a normal life?”

Transcript

PAGE ONE

Panel One:  Sheena Glamm beats up the guy who stabbed her

STARR (cap): “Sometimes I wish things had turned out differently”

Panel Two:  Sheena has a baby.

STARR (cap): “Maybe I could’ve had kids…”

Panel Three: Old Sheena holds a baby up, next to a young man and woman.

STARR (cap): “…or grandkids”

Panel Four.: Starr walks through the bus, waving to Karl and Dave.

STARR (cap): “Not that I mind being the mythic aunt of the Lynes”

Panel Five: Starr puts her hands in her pocket, walking with her head down

STARR (cap): “I just wonder”

PAGE TWO

Panel One:  Old Sheena watches as shoulders run in a vast yard

STARR (cap): “What would it be like to see your prodigy, running around?”

Panel Two:  Shot of two of the kids, who look like Sheena

STARR (cap): “To see yourself in them?”

Panel Three:  Blur of the grandkids as they run faster

STARR (cap): “To live in their blood?”

Panel Four:  Further abstraction

STARR (cap): “Would this be a normal life?”

See More

Life of Sheena: Part 1

By Comics, Featured, Featured Comics

PAGE ONE

Panel One: Starr stands in a cramped tour bus bathroom with her glasses off, surrounded by her bandmates’ face and makeup products, holding an open jar of hair gel.

STARR (cap): “Today, I’m turning 70.” 

Panel Two: Starr spikes her hair

STARR (cap): “I know, right?”

Panel Three: Starr puts her glasses on

STARR (cap): “These sunglasses hide a lot, but if you look really close you can see lines on my face.”

Panel Four: Zoom into her glasses.

STARR (cap): “But you have to look very close.”

Panel Five: Zoom in to eye closeup, with the mesh sunglasses pattern and lines and creases on her face (circular panel)

STARR (cap): “With a magnifying glass.”

PAGE TWO

Panel One: Star-shaped panel with mesh pattern.  

STARR (cap): “I don’t think anyone connected the dots

Panel Two: Shot of Sheena Glamm, Starr's former persona, posing with her band, including Kenji Davenport

STARR (cap): “But I was 20 in 1973 and that makes me 70 now” 

Panel Three: Shot of Starr with her current band --Bébé, Karl, and Dave-- in a similar photo.

STARR (cap): “Of course, I’m not going to tell anyone”

Panel Four: Back to Starr getting ready in the bathroom, applying lipstick.

STARR (cap): “I’m gonna keep it all to myself”

Transcript

PAGE ONE

Panel One: Starr stands in a cramped tour bus bathroom with her glasses off, surrounded by her bandmates’ face and makeup products, holding an open jar of hair gel.

STARR (cap): “Today, I’m turning 70.” 

Panel Two: Starr spikes her hair

STARR (cap): “I know, right?”

Panel Three: Starr puts her glasses on

STARR (cap): “These sunglasses hide a lot, but if you look really close you can see lines on my face.”

Panel Four: Zoom into her glasses.

STARR (cap): “But you have to look very close.”

Panel Five: Zoom in to eye closeup, with the mesh sunglasses pattern and lines and creases on her face (circular panel)

STARR (cap): “With a magnifying glass.”

PAGE TWO

Panel One: Star-shaped panel with mesh pattern.  

STARR (cap): “I don’t think anyone connected the dots

Panel Two: Shot of Sheena Glamm, Starr’s former persona, posing with her band, including Kenji Davenport

STARR (cap): “But I was 20 in 1973 and that makes me 70 now” 

Panel Three: Shot of Starr with her current band –Bébé, Karl, and Dave– in a similar photo.

STARR (cap): “Of course, I’m not going to tell anyone”

Panel Four: Back to Starr getting ready in the bathroom, applying lipstick.

STARR (cap): “I’m gonna keep it all to myself”

See More

Wild and Whimsical — No Strings Attached!

By Arts & Culture, Featured, Photo Essay, SAIC

Shoe String Puppet Cabaret’s poster designed by Ayla Scott advertising the Cabaret event.

Smut, Drag, and puppets! On Sunday, April 28, 2024, Shoe String Puppets hosted a cabaret show at the Color Club in Elston Chicago. “Shoe String Puppet Cabaret” featured eight acts and over 20 performers.

F Newsmagazine asked the Shoe String Puppets group about their formation and success.

Mya Nicole Jones: Who are the founders of Shoe String Puppets?

Shoe String Puppets: Shoe String Puppets is a small puppet collective started by Sophia Tarducci, Ethan Simone, and Soph Schiavone. We met at SAIC’s puppetry and performance class taught by Blair Thomas. We just happened to be randomly assigned to a group project together and it just took off from there! That was about a year ago. We just seem like we have really great chemistry and creative direction together, mostly it’s just fun to make puppet shows with your friends!

MNJ: How did it feel to plan the Cabaret show at the Color Club?

SSP: As a group, we’ve done quite a few puppet performances together, but usually we are a part of a performance showcase. This time we had a show and we wanted somewhere to perform it, so we decided to just make an event. It took us a couple of months to plan, getting the venue, creating applications for performers, rehearsing, etc. Honestly, a lot of the work ended up happening the day of [the cabaret]. We’ve never done anything like this so the actual setup and performance was a bit of a learning curve. But everyone was so patient and excited. We are so grateful to all the performers, all the shows were so incredible and they really made the night!

MNJ: What is the future of Shoe String Puppets?

SSP: We are always thinking about shows and fun puppet ideas so we definitely have some things in the works. We would love to do some outdoor puppet stuff this summer and we really love doing cool collaborative projects. We believe this is just the start for Shoe String Puppets!

Drag performer Mads Reardon performs “Dog Show Fancy” as the opening act. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Marianna Gallegos-Garcia’s multi-puppet and prop performance of “Za Ha Ha.” Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Agnotti and Tanima use their bodies as puppets performing as wildly cellular clowns. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Fanny the Consumer, the puppet, is being controlled from behind by Daniella Loza, Alejandro Loza, Orion Welacha-Garcia, and Alex Azul. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Performer and writer Suz stands at the microphone engaging with the audience reading a choose your own adventure smut story. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Emma Johnson shares the history of Groundhog’s Day while donning a crafted crowned groundhog head. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Jocelyn Rainwater, Fawn Bell, and Rowan Davis present a fairytale with a barter, a bunny puppet, and, of course, a giant articulated head. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Shoe String Puppets’ very own Nathan puppet, controlled by Sophia Tarducci, Ethan Simone, and Soph Schiavone, speaks with three spirits, played by the same people controlling him. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Closing bows with the Cabaret performers and team. Photo by Mya Nicole Jones.

Read More

Something Kinky This Way Comes

By Arts & Culture, Featured, Photo Essay

LA&M Archivist Mel Leverich carefully flips through a large folder of photographs documenting kinky events. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

“This belongs in a museum.” The famous Indiana Jones quote probably makes you think of ancient artifacts and masterpiece paintings. But have you ever seen a ball gag or a spanking bench displayed in a museum?

The Leather Archives & Museum, housed in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood, is a living legacy of fetish culture. Through a combination of its archive, museum, library, and auditorium, the LA&M accomplishes its mission statement of, “making leather, kink, BDSM, and fetish accessible through research, preservation, education, and community engagement.”

A wall of fetish gear includes collars, chains, floggers, and gags with signs inviting museum-goers to touch. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

The LA&M’s archival collection is open for anyone to use for research, and archivist Mel Leverich is there to help you navigate the collection that ranges from fetish gear to zines to photographs to leather jackets to a massive collection of pins and patches. The archives house materials from the 1950s to today.

Leverich walks through the archives of the museum. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

“The LA&M is one of a kind. There is no other,” said SAIC professor Kirin Wachter-Grene and former LA&M visiting scholar, researching Black women’s historical, manifold involvement with leather, fetish, and kink communities

Leather is a subculture coming out of gay men’s motorcycle clubs in the 1950s and ‘60s, but it has evolved a great deal over time. Kink is an umbrella term that identifies anything sexual that isn’t within the realm of normative sex, and fetishes are about the enjoyment of a particular experience or object, including leather. BDSM is a kink but it also refers to sexual relationships engaged in powerplay. “These communities historically have been highly marginalized and suppressed and censored. If you’re kinky, if you’re involved in these communities, there’s not a lot of places where you can express that without being censored in some way,” said Leverich.

Hanging on the walls of the LA&M auditorium are large murals painted by Dom “Etienne” Orejudos, created for and preserved from Chicago gay bars in the mid-20th century. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

“Kink, BDSM, fetish, leather — I mean those are some of the ways that people live every day expressing themselves, sexually and radically in relation to others and to self. To me, it’s just absolutely devastating to think about that material living in darkness forever or disappearing,” said Wachter-Grene. She added, “That’s why it’s so important because if the Leather Archives wasn’t collecting this stuff, no one would.”

The LA&M was founded by Chuck Renslow and Tony DeBlase. Renslow was a local LGBTQ+ businessman, gay activist, and photographer. Meanwhile, DeBlase, who worked at the Field Museum, founded DungeonMaster Magazine and designed the leather pride flag. Leverich explained that the LA&M started as a small shop front on Clark Street, and quickly outgrew the space, moving into its current location in 1996.

“It was founded in the ‘90s by people who were donating their friends’ and lovers’ materials who were people who died from AIDS related complications at that time when it was just a plague against queer people who the government was more than happy to see wiped off the face of the Earth. It was a way of honoring a life,” said Wachter-Grene.

The library of the LA&M provides a free space for anyone to dive into queer history, pulp fiction, and erotic zines. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

Leverich explained that their favorite type of material in the archive is personal accounts. Leverich also stressed that when people donate materials today, they should not overlook that emails, texts, and social media are equally important forms of documentation.

Despite leather clubs being started by white, gay men, the leather and kink community is for anyone.

“There’s a very strong active women’s leather community. There are people of all identities involved in the leather community. There are leather clubs specifically by and for trans people.  There are leather clubs specifically by and for people of color, and, obviously, tons of clubs that are open to everybody,” said Leverich.

A wall of women’s leather vests displayed in the museum shows off two key elements of the leather community: the collecting of pins and patches from events, friends, and clubs; and the competitive leather titles community members can win as part of charity events. Photo by Sidne K. Gard.

The museum in particular works to highlight the many different identities within the kink community. For example, one exhibit, which Wachter-Grene made a point to highlight in her interview, is dedicated to and about Mistress Velvet, a Chicagoan Black, non-binary dominatrix, activist, and social worker as a way of honoring her life after her passing in 2021. The museum regularly spotlights modern LGBTQ+ artists’ work and has two important spaces geared toward community building and learning. Their non-lending library is free to the public and has books on queer and kinky histories, graphic novels, zines, and an entire back wall of pulp fiction erotica. Additionally, they host regular monthly events including kink classes and film screenings in their auditorium.

Correction: The print edition misidentified that Kirin Wachter-Grene guest curated the Leather Archives and Museum exhibit dedicated to Mistress Velvet. Wachter-Grene interviewed Mistress Velvet in an issue of “The Black Scholar” which she guest-edited. 

Read More

Explorations in blue

By Comics, Featured Comics

Transcript

Panel One: A young girl sets off for her new journey.

Panel Two: The girl wanders in front of the various path entrances.

Panel Three: The girl breaks the balance sometimes while she struggles to maintain the balance.

Panel Four: The girl stands at the matrix of the different paths.

Panel Five: The girl doesn’t drink but stumbles along her journey.

Panel Six: The girl wants to numb, to ease.

Panel Seven: The girl escapes along the journey, folded and unfolded.

Panel Eight: The girl reflects on her experience and reorganizes her thoughts.

Panel Nine: The girl hangs out with her friend to enjoy the journey in the infinity.

See More

MCA’s On Stage: Resonance ‘Tremor’

By Arts & Culture, Featured

Samita Sinha, “Tremor,” Danspace Project, 2023. Photo by Rachel Keane.

The seats are in a circle, and despite many stage lights, it’s hazy and smoky as if a large fire was just put out. Three seats are placed in the center and all face each other triangularly. They are accompanied by cascading translucent red fabric that descends from the ceiling. Thunderous rumbling is emitted through various speakers placed throughout the stage. One seat holds a mixing console, another, a wooden instrument, and another, speakers.

The lights dim and a group of four performers enter from behind the seats. They are all barefoot and wear either black or charcoal gray shapeless clothes. They enter in a single file line and begin circling the stage. Suddenly one performer lets out a single piercing note.

This is how “Tremor” Samita Sinha’s latest work begins.

Samita Sinha is a composer and vocalist who aims to use Indian vocal traditions and vocal vibrations to explore language itself and asks the audience to be present and consider instances of silence within the feelings the vocal performances may bring up. “Tremor” is her latest work which premiered November 9, 2023, at Dancespace in New York City. It came to Chicago at the Museum of Contemporary Art on April 18-20, 2024.

Sinha is joined by dancer Darrell Jones and musician and dramaturg Sunil Bald. Bald also collaborated with Sinha in the stage design as they worked to create a spacious environment that invites intimacy between both the performers and their vocal performances. As the former curator of performance at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tara Aisha Willis describes the “On Stage: Resonance” series, and “Tremor” specifically, stating “Sinha’s long standing vocal practice, which filters traditional Indian music techniques through space at a cellular scale, vibration her body as a microcosm interconnected well beyond her own skin — The minimalism of the diagrams, a single hum might seem simple, but it comes to feel complex and changing in Sinha’s approach.”

As the performance continues, the performers step out of line and take their seats. Jones continues to stand and dance in the center of the stage as Sinha and Bald continue to vocalize and harmonize together. The lights continue to dim and the only things illuminated are the red fabric of the seats.

As “Tremor” continues, there are periods of quiet where Sinha is the only one vocalizing and other instances where Sinha and Bald harmonize together and increase in volume while the sound of thunderous rumbling, heavy winds, and helicopter blades play through the speakers on stage. Throughout the performance, the stage remains mostly dark but the lighting continues to change. At times only Sinha is illuminated and at other times the lights are nearly fully dimmed.

Occasionally, the only word that can be used to describe “Tremor” is visceral. Some portions of the performance completely overload the senses. Other times it’s quiet, Sinha vocalizes in a way that emits a sense of crying or pain. She sings in intervals while she strums an ektaara a lute instrument with a single string. Bald also vocalizes in intervals and at times his performance is reminiscent of chants that priests conduct during Hindu prayers. As they sing, Jones remains still, however as the singing crescendos Jones stands up slowly and begins dancing in the center of the stage.

Towards the end of the performance, Sinha slowly rises from her seat. She continues to quietly sing as she makes her way to center stage. Bald and Jones rise in tandem and join Sinha in the center. They all take a seat in a circle as the lights turn to them and softly illuminate the three of them. The background sounds go completely silent with only Sinha and Bald singing.

The contrast in performance is completely intended by Sinha. As Willis points out, “Tremor” is a reminder to be present with our sensations and those of the people around us — Vocal sound can carry a listener from the most painful sensation to the most blissful, and make evident how often these are inseparable.”

Although the emotions “Tremor” intends to bring up do not conclude, it ends as the performers fall silent. The lights turn on and the stage is no longer hazy. The performers stand up and exit through the back, where they entered.

 

Read More

Jam Comic

By and Comics, Featured Comics


Panel One: A person wearing a black t-shirt is leaning up against a bus stop sign and tapping on their phone as they wait for the bus. On the bench next to them, a pigeon is sitting.

Panel Two: A witch with a crow on her shoulder walks into the frame. The person looks up as the pigeon flies away in response.

Panel Three: The person takes a photo of the witch and attempts to be sneaky about it. 

Panel Four: the crow on the witches shoulder opens its beak to caw and a ray of magic shoots out.

Panel Five: The person is struck by the ray of magic and their body begins to warp as and melt in the force of the beam.

Panel Six: A black panel labeled “the eternal void.” Two people are sitting in the background playing cards. The person from the bus stop falls into frame and one of them asks, “You tried to take a picture too, huh?”

Transcript

Panel One: A person wearing a black t-shirt is leaning up against a bus stop sign and tapping on their phone as they wait for the bus. On the bench next to them, a pigeon is sitting.

Panel Two: A witch with a crow on her shoulder walks into the frame. The person looks up as the pigeon flies away in response.

Panel Three: The person takes a photo of the witch and attempts to be sneaky about it. 

Panel Four: the crow on the witches shoulder opens its beak to caw and a ray of magic shoots out.

Panel Five: The person is struck by the ray of magic and their body begins to warp as and melt in the force of the beam.

Panel Six: A black panel labeled “the eternal void.” Two people are sitting in the background playing cards. The person from the bus stop falls into frame and one of them asks, “You tried to take a picture too, huh?”

See More

Senior Year? Part 4: What Are You So Scared Of?

By Comics, Featured, Featured Comics

Panel One: Ellie is sitting criss-cross on their bed with a blanket wrapped over their head and a tuxedo cat curled up next to them. A black box in the corner of the panel says 2:00 AM. They address the reader and say, “Pssst!” “Do you wanna know what really scared me about life post-grad?

Panel Two: a close up shot of Ellie from the chest up, counting their points off on their fingers as they say, “It’s not getting a job or like, student debt, or the millions of other reasons to be scared of adulthood today, although that does keep me up at night.” 

Panel Three: Close up shot continued. Ellie puts their hands down and their face sinks. They say, “What horrifies me most, is that I might stop making things.”

Panel Fiour: Close up shot continued. Ellie pulls the blanket off of their head and their eyes fall to the ground. They say, “Whether because of money or life, the world, or just a lack of juice,”

Panel Five: The shot pulls back and we see their full body sitting on their bed again. The cat in the corner wakes up and stretches his back as Ellie looks straight ahead, wraps themselves tighter in their blanket and says, “one day I might just- stop. And not notice, or care.”

Panel Six: A close up shot of Ellie’s hand petting the cat. They say, “I'm just scared of this all being a waste.”

Panel Seven: A close up of Ellie’s face looking down towards the cat. They say “I don't know what I am if not this. And I’ve come to quite like this.”

Transcript

Panel One: Ellie is sitting criss-cross on their bed with a blanket wrapped over their head and a tuxedo cat curled up next to them. A black box in the corner of the panel says 2:00 AM. They address the reader and say, “Pssst!” “Do you wanna know what really scared me about life post-grad?

Panel Two: a close up shot of Ellie from the chest up, counting their points off on their fingers as they say, “It’s not getting a job or like, student debt, or the millions of other reasons to be scared of adulthood today, although that does keep me up at night.” 

Panel Three: Close up shot continued. Ellie puts their hands down and their face sinks. They say, “What horrifies me most, is that I might stop making things.”

Panel Fiour: Close up shot continued. Ellie pulls the blanket off of their head and their eyes fall to the ground. They say, “Whether because of money or life, the world, or just a lack of juice,”

Panel Five: The shot pulls back and we see their full body sitting on their bed again. The cat in the corner wakes up and stretches his back as Ellie looks straight ahead, wraps themselves tighter in their blanket and says, “one day I might just- stop. And not notice, or care.”

Panel Six: A close up shot of Ellie’s hand petting the cat. They say, “I’m just scared of this all being a waste.”

Panel Seven: A close up of Ellie’s face looking down towards the cat. They say “I don’t know what I am if not this. And I’ve come to quite like this.”

See More

Neuroaesthetics

By Comics, Featured, Featured Comics

Transcript

Panel One: A cartoon brain that is trembling, with a musical staff flowing out of it. Geometric shapes decorate the bottom right corner. The caption at the top says “Neuroaesthetics”.

Panel Two: The caption says, “Flowers blooming in the desert”. A close up image of a blue and purple flower. A smaller panel in the top left depicts a leaf while the small panel in the bottom right shows the flower in its entirety.

Panel Three: “BOOM (to grow rapidly)” is in the center with a cartoon explosion effect in the background.

Panel Four: The caption says, “A bubble that bursts”. Two purple and blue colored bubbles, one smaller than the other. In the corner, lines depict a bubble that has been popped.

Panel Five: A long sequence of images in a stretched out panel. “BUBBLE” is written in a bubble with a bubble blower stick beside it. “SOAP” is written on a bar of pink soap, suds in the corner. “SOAP OPERA” is written on a microphone with music notes floating above. The word “STAGE” is centered on a stage with a light shining down on it.

Panel Six: The words, “Where reality is” is written at the top. The word “SUSPENDED” is hanging directly beneath on rope, rotated on its side with falling action lines.

Panel Seven: “ART” in big bubble letters that fill the panel. A pencil, pen, paintbrush, and crayon are in the four corners pointing toward the letters.

Panel Eight: The caption says, “A Representation of” at the top. Below is a silhouette of a head turned to the right. An oval in the middle of the head is empty except for the word, “THOUGHT”.

See More